Curing and Preventing Disease and Promoting Public Health: Rockefeller Foundation, 1909

Source: 
Center for Strategic Philanthropy and Civil Society (Duke)

Date

2007

Case Study Sector

Health

In 1892, John D. Rockefeller appointed Frederick T. Gates, a former Baptist minister and administrator of the American Baptist Education Society, to advise and direct his philanthropic activities. Through the work of another Rockefeller philanthropic organization, the General Education Board, Gates was introduced to the Dr. Charles Stiles, a zoologist and public health official. Stiles strongly advocated for action to combat the hookworm disease in the American South, an affliction by which victims are infected when small worms entered the bloodstream by boring through the victims’ bare feet. Gates was immediately drawn to the challenge and excited about the possibility of devoting Rockefeller’s resources to eradicating the disease. In October 1909, Gates, Rockefeller’s son John D. Rockefeller Jr., and twenty others formed the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission, chaired by Gates, for the Eradication of Hookworm Disease in the South. Rockefeller granted $1 million over five years to the new commission.
Between 1909 and 1913, the Sanitary Commission, under the administrative leadership of Dr. Wickliffe Rose, a professor of philosophy at Peabody College in Nashville, mounted an assault on hookworm disease in the South. Rose developed a strategy that became a template for controlling diseases throughout the world. . . .

Link

Keyword

  • Field Building
  • Strategy

Region

  • Northern America

Blog Posts

Events

Sep 16

JOIN JOEL FLEISHMAN VIA ZOOM FOR THE FIRST FALL 2020 FOUNDATION IMPACT RESEARCH GROUP (FIRG) SEMINAR